Regular lazy pup and mini lazy pup are normally mortal enemies, on account of the fact that mini lazy pup is an obnoxious, mentally unstable sociopath on four legs. But when it’s wicked cold, like it is today, they’ll huddle together to stay warm. Which, I suppose, is what families do.

Regular lazy pup and mini lazy pup are normally mortal enemies, on account of the fact that mini lazy pup is an obnoxious, mentally unstable sociopath on four legs. But when it’s wicked cold, like it is today, they’ll huddle together to stay warm. Which, I suppose, is what families do.

Forgot to mention: last night at dinner, our friend Gary was goofing around and he asked the boy if he had a girlfriend or a boyfriend, and the boy said, matter-of-factly, “Oh, I’m not gay. I like girls, but I don’t have a GF right now.”
The boy’s admission was hilarious and adorable in its casualness, although I’ll admit I was surprised that my son has given any thought to this at all. I guess I have long suspected that my kid is probably straight, which is cool, but to hear him say it out loud made me kinda sorta happy and kinda sorta sad at the same time.
I’m happy that my kid feels confident enough in himself that saying he’s not gay is NBD, but I guess I’m a little sad, too, cuz, well, it’s weird when you realize that your kid is not like you. I imagine this is what a straight parent must feel like when his or her kid admits to being gay or lesbian.
At age seven, I don’t know that my kid fully understands yet what being “gay” or being “straight” means, but he seems to understand that you love (or like) what and/or whom you love (or like), and he’s OK with that, so therefore, I’m OK with that, too.

Forgot to mention: last night at dinner, our friend Gary was goofing around and he asked the boy if he had a girlfriend or a boyfriend, and the boy said, matter-of-factly, “Oh, I’m not gay. I like girls, but I don’t have a GF right now.”

The boy’s admission was hilarious and adorable in its casualness, although I’ll admit I was surprised that my son has given any thought to this at all. I guess I have long suspected that my kid is probably straight, which is cool, but to hear him say it out loud made me kinda sorta happy and kinda sorta sad at the same time.

I’m happy that my kid feels confident enough in himself that saying he’s not gay is NBD, but I guess I’m a little sad, too, cuz, well, it’s weird when you realize that your kid is not like you. I imagine this is what a straight parent must feel like when his or her kid admits to being gay or lesbian.

At age seven, I don’t know that my kid fully understands yet what being “gay” or being “straight” means, but he seems to understand that you love (or like) what and/or whom you love (or like), and he’s OK with that, so therefore, I’m OK with that, too.

Even though he is completely shizzballs nuts, sometimes I look at mini lazy pup and think to myself, Jeez, what good fortune allowed me to end up with such an adorbz pup? He’s awight.

Even though he is completely shizzballs nuts, sometimes I look at mini lazy pup and think to myself, Jeez, what good fortune allowed me to end up with such an adorbz pup? He’s awight.

During the boy’s bath, he said to me, “Dad, I wish I was already a big brother.” And I said, Yeah, me, too. And the boy said, “When do you think my baby sister or baby brother is coming home?” And I said, I dunno, we’ll see. And the boy said, “I hope my baby sister or baby brother comes before I go to college!” And I said, Oh dear lord, me, too!
It dawned on me that I was about the boy’s age when my younger brother was born. After spending the first seven or so years of my life as the baby of the family, I was suddenly no longer the youngest when my brother was born. In retrospect, that change in birth order probably had a much bigger impact on my life than I realized back then.
I remember thinking at the time that I couldn’t really be a “baby” anymore, that I had to “grow up.” And then I spent the rest of my childhood trying to grow up as quickly as possible and move on with my life.
I hope the boy doesn’t feel the same way as I did. I hope he realizes that even when his baby sister or baby brother arrives, he’ll always be my baby, no matter what.
I sometimes hear parents say that they can’t wait until their kids can do more things (i.e., wishing they’d grow up and become more independent) but at the same time these parents complain about their kids growing up too quickly (i.e., they’re not “baby cute” anymore). These parents are morons, no offense. Kids grow up way too quickly as it is and wanting them to rush through childhood is a terrible mistake, IMHO.
At age seven, my kid already so desperately wants to be an adult. But I’m fighting tooth and nail to make sure that he takes his time and enjoys being a kid for as long as he can because childhood doesn’t ever last long enough.

During the boy’s bath, he said to me, “Dad, I wish I was already a big brother.” And I said, Yeah, me, too. And the boy said, “When do you think my baby sister or baby brother is coming home?” And I said, I dunno, we’ll see. And the boy said, “I hope my baby sister or baby brother comes before I go to college!” And I said, Oh dear lord, me, too!

It dawned on me that I was about the boy’s age when my younger brother was born. After spending the first seven or so years of my life as the baby of the family, I was suddenly no longer the youngest when my brother was born. In retrospect, that change in birth order probably had a much bigger impact on my life than I realized back then.

I remember thinking at the time that I couldn’t really be a “baby” anymore, that I had to “grow up.” And then I spent the rest of my childhood trying to grow up as quickly as possible and move on with my life.

I hope the boy doesn’t feel the same way as I did. I hope he realizes that even when his baby sister or baby brother arrives, he’ll always be my baby, no matter what.

I sometimes hear parents say that they can’t wait until their kids can do more things (i.e., wishing they’d grow up and become more independent) but at the same time these parents complain about their kids growing up too quickly (i.e., they’re not “baby cute” anymore). These parents are morons, no offense. Kids grow up way too quickly as it is and wanting them to rush through childhood is a terrible mistake, IMHO.

At age seven, my kid already so desperately wants to be an adult. But I’m fighting tooth and nail to make sure that he takes his time and enjoys being a kid for as long as he can because childhood doesn’t ever last long enough.

Lately, the boy seems especially pre-occupied thinking about marriage and relationships. At dinner last night, while the boy was playing with his food, out of the blue he asked me, “Dad, when are you and daddy gonna get married?” And I said, I dunno, one day, I suppose. And the boy said, “But when???” And I said, Maybe after I lose 10 pounds, and I let my hurr did grow out a bit, and when marriage equality exists in every state, then I guess daddy and I will get married?
And the boy said, “I dunno what you just said, but when you and daddy get married, I don’t want to be the flower boy.” And I said, How come? And the boy said, “Because I’m shy and I don’t want people looking at me carrying a bunch of flowers.”
And I said, Well, you can be the ring-bearer instead, if you want. And the boy said, “What does a ring-bear do?” And I said, A ring-bearer carries the rings at the wedding and gives it to the people getting married. And the boy said, “Oh yeah, I want to do that!” And I said, Great, then it’s settled!

Lately, the boy seems especially pre-occupied thinking about marriage and relationships. At dinner last night, while the boy was playing with his food, out of the blue he asked me, “Dad, when are you and daddy gonna get married?” And I said, I dunno, one day, I suppose. And the boy said, “But when???” And I said, Maybe after I lose 10 pounds, and I let my hurr did grow out a bit, and when marriage equality exists in every state, then I guess daddy and I will get married?

And the boy said, “I dunno what you just said, but when you and daddy get married, I don’t want to be the flower boy.” And I said, How come? And the boy said, “Because I’m shy and I don’t want people looking at me carrying a bunch of flowers.”

And I said, Well, you can be the ring-bearer instead, if you want. And the boy said, “What does a ring-bear do?” And I said, A ring-bearer carries the rings at the wedding and gives it to the people getting married. And the boy said, “Oh yeah, I want to do that!” And I said, Great, then it’s settled!